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Soulforce - Day 1
Jul 18, 2006

Dear Friends,

When I arrived last night, the Soulforce group was eating a late dinner after completing the first 12 miles of their march from Denver to Colorado Springs.  This hotel is right across the street from Focus on The Family, and this morning in the light, I'll get my first view of their huge campus. In an hour from now I get on the bus and head up to Denver for 13 more miles of the march today.  I'm responsible for 4.5 of those miles, that will mark the official release of Straight Into Gay America.

The day long plane ride that went first through Dallas was a good day to think back on this past year.  One year ago today, I finished unicycling my 1024 miles of last summer's tour. The books rushed from the printer to this hotel were here last night for me to have a first view.  Sometime this week I'll get these thoughts together enough to share.  Tonight or tomorrow morning I'll tell you about today.  I need to get ready to board the bus. But...

Here's why we're here:  Read the Soulforce Press Release describing Sociologist Judith Stacey's remarks.  Listen carefully to what she says, and how Focus on the Family uses her research opposite to its intention.  Here's a bit of it below.

Off to the bus. Blessings,

Lars


Joining the families for a press conference to kickoff the 65-mile relay march from Denver to the headquarters of Focus on the Family in Colorado Springs was Dr. Judith Stacey, a professor of sociology from New York University. Stacey's research on the children of same-sex parents has been misquoted by Focus on the Family to justify discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people and their families.

Stacey reiterated for the assembled families and news media the basic conclusion of her research: "The sexual orientation or gender combination of the parents raising children does not have much impact on children's development; the quality of the parents' relationship and the quality of their parenting does." Stacey concluded that although there can be slight variations, even advantages, to the development of children of same-sex parents, these were "differences, not deficiencies."

Stacey contradicted the argument most often made in denying same-sex couples the equal rights and responsibilities of marriage: that children do better in families headed by heterosexual couples. "Whenever you hear Focus on the Family, legislators or lawyers say, 'studies prove that children do better in families with a mother and a father,' they are referring to studies which compare two-parent heterosexual households to single-parent households. The studies they are talking about do not cite research on families headed by gay and lesbian couples." Stacey said the tragedy of this inaccurate quoting of legitimate research is that it has real negative effects on same-sex couples and their children. She cited the recent New York state superior court decision that used this unproven argument to deny same-sex couples and their children the rights and benefits of marriage.

"The bottom line is there is no research-based reason to deny rights to same-sex couples and their children. We should be passing laws and making policies that make life easier for all families -- not harder."

Joining the families for a press conference to kickoff the 65-mile relay march from Denver to the headquarters of Focus on the Family in Colorado Springs was Dr. Judith Stacey, a professor of sociology from New York University. Stacey's research on the children of same-sex parents has been misquoted by Focus on the Family to justify discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people and their families.

Stacey reiterated for the assembled families and news media the basic conclusion of her research: "The sexual orientation or gender combination of the parents raising children does not have much impact on children's development; the quality of the parents' relationship and the quality of their parenting does." Stacey concluded that although there can be slight variations, even advantages, to the development of children of same-sex parents, these were "differences, not deficiencies."

Stacey contradicted the argument most often made in denying same-sex couples the equal rights and responsibilities of marriage: that children do better in families headed by heterosexual couples. "Whenever you hear Focus on the Family, legislators or lawyers say, 'studies prove that children do better in families with a mother and a father,' they are referring to studies which compare two-parent heterosexual households to single-parent households. The studies they are talking about do not cite research on families headed by gay and lesbian couples." Stacey said the tragedy of this inaccurate quoting of legitimate research is that it has real negative effects on same-sex couples and their children. She cited the recent New York state superior court decision that used this unproven argument to deny same-sex couples and their children the rights and benefits of marriage.

"The bottom line is there is no research-based reason to deny rights to same-sex couples and their children. We should be passing laws and making policies that make life easier for all families -- not harder."

READ THE FULL PRESS RELEASE

 

 


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